Jeff is a great kid! He just forgets.

Do you recognize these people?

bwc_lifespan

Annie, age 35

Annie is an attractive mother of three.  To look at her you would never guess what a disaster every area of her life has been since college.  As a young teacher, she never developed lesson plans and couldn’t control her classes.  She wanted to do something else but didn’t feel she had the skills.  Instead, she started a family.  As a homemaker, she rarely cooks a meal, struggles to pick up the house before her husband gets home from work, and has 45 half-done projects.  She manages the family finances–writes the checks, but forgets to mail them.  Her relationship with her husband is poor, and she feels guilty about not meeting her children’s needs.  She’s depressed, and her self-esteem is in the pits.

Adam, age 19

In high school, Adam was the class clown; everyone liked him.  Now, he goes to college because “that’s what everybody does!”  With the distractions of college life–being away from home for the first time, fraternity parties, weekend football games, and wild roommates–he is no longer able to get by on his quick mind and entertaining personality.  By the end of his first semester, he is on academic probation.  Despite this warning, threats by his parents, and all his good intentions, at the end of the second semester, Adam is asked not to return next fall.

Jeff, age 11

Jeff is a great kid!  He just forgets.  He forgets what his homework is.  He forgets to bring home the science book to study for tomorrow’s unit test.  He forgets to bring home his instrument for band practice.  He forgets to hang up his coat, to put his shoes away, and to throw his dirty clothes in the hamper.  He forgets to take out the garbage and to feed the dog.  He forgets to brush his teeth, to tuck his shirt in, and to make his bed.  If Mom wasn’t there to nag him, he’d probably forget everything–but still, he is a great kid.

Do you recognize Justin, Karen, or Lisa?
Do you recognize Melissa, Mark, or Betty?
Do you recognize Tina, Doug, or John?

These are my patients.  You may have recognized your son or daughter, your spouse, your parents, even yourself.  I’ve come to appreciate how ADD can look quite different across the lifespan, depending on circumstances, temperament, and expectations.  For some people, managing a home and family brings the conflict with ADD to a head.  For others, it’s the high expectations (and failures) at college.  Still others struggle in the smaller ways, like chronically forgetting homework.

Our current blog series is here to help you sort through the challenges of identifying and treating ADD / ADHD.  You might find there are a number of things you don’t know about ADD (but should).  You might find that you recognize my patients.  If you’re seeking answers, you’re always welcome at The Being Well Center, or you can download my free e-book, ADD Basics 101, in which I guide you through 10 clear steps to securing a diagnosis and treatment plan you can trust.

Patients of all shapes, ages, and sizes come to The Being Well Center and Dr. Craig Liden for diagnoses and treatment plans they can trust. Can we help you too? Visit The Being Well Center for more information about Dr. Liden’s services.

Our current blog series is excerpted from Dr. Liden’s best-selling book, Pay Attention!: Answers to Common Questions About the Diagnosis and Treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder.

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About cblmd

medical director of the being well center, ADHD expert, speaker, and author

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