Meet Dr. Liden, Part I

Dr. Craig Liden | The Being Well CenterI first became aware of Attention Deficit Disorder or ADD when I was a Pediatric Resident in training at the Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Boston.

When I began my rotations in the outpatient clinics, I expected to face challenging, diagnostic dilemmas involving clear-cut medical problems. Instead, I found that most of the children referred to these clinics were sent because of learning or behavior problems. I soon discovered that ADD was one of the most common reasons for these children’s difficulties.

At the time I really knew nothing about ADD.

I vaguely remembered hearing something about it during a lecture in medical school. As I tried to become more informed about Attention Deficit Disorder, I found that ADD was only superficially described in my textbooks; there was no standard reference book on the topic; and journal articles rarely agreed about what to call it, what it was, what caused it, or what to do about it.

I struggled to apply my simple cause-effect, medical model to ADD and what I got in return was frustration. So did my parents!

As a result of my frustration, I realized I could help myself to better understand and treat learning and behavior problems only with additional training in this area. I participated in a fellowship at Harvard designed to teach pediatricians how to research, teach about, and treat these problems.

During this fellowship, I began to develop an appreciation that learning and behavior problems, like ADD, are far from simple; that they are, in fact, highly complex.

I also learned that, as a physician, I have an important role to play in diagnosing and managing these problems, but that I can never do it alone. To be effective, I need to mesh my knowledge and skills with those of teachers, psychologists, speech-language pathologists, counselors, and others.

During my fellowship training, I had the opportunity to leave the hospital setting and see kids in the “real world.” While conducting research in schools, I was shocked to find that the children I had been seeing at the hospital’s clinics represented only the tip of the iceberg. More than a third of the apparently normal children I worked with demonstrated some type of problem in their learning or behavior. And attention problems were the most common.

After my fellowship, I took a faculty position in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh and started a program called the Child Development Unit at the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh. This position gave me the opportunity to develop and research my own testing procedures for problems like ADD.

Being Well CenterIn addition, I had the chance to put together a unique team approach to address these problems. Team members included social workers, psychologists, special educators, and speech-language pathologists, as well as medical staff.

Throughout my years at Children’s Hospital, I also struggled with the frustration of trying to teach medical students and residents about learning and behavior problems. Similar to the feelings that I had experienced as a Pediatric Resident, most of them hoped to diagnose simple problems that would respond to the neat technological approaches that worked so well in other areas of medicine.

Unfortunately, problems like ADD do not fit this mold.

At this stage in my professional development, I focused too intensely on the diagnosis of problems like ADD and not enough on effective treatment.

Treatment, generally, was limited to a lengthy diagnostic report to a school. These reports concluded with recommendations telling teachers how to do their job better, and they did so without considering the kinds of resources, or lack of resources, at each school.

Needless to say, such pontificators from the ivory tower of the university did not promote the cooperative working atmosphere that would be most beneficial to my patients.

I also tended to refer the management of problems like ADD back to family doctors, pediatricians, or community mental health professionals who frequently had little training or experience. Unknowingly, this approach stirred up everyone’s concern but gave little practical support or guidance about how to deal with the problems.

If I hadn’t had to live with the ramifications of ADD in my own home, I probably would have stayed with the approach for a long time, thinking I was really making a difference in people’s lives… [Read more tomorrow for Part II]


Check back tomorrow for Part II of Dr. Liden’s personal journey that has helped him become a leading international expert on the treatment and diagnosis of ADD/ADHD.

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About cblmd

medical director of the being well center, ADHD expert, speaker, and author

2 thoughts on “Meet Dr. Liden, Part I

  1. Pingback: Meet Dr. Liden, Part II | The Being Well Center

  2. Pingback: The Prognosis for ADD | The Being Well Center

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