How a Teacher makes a difference with an ADD Student

image via Flickr, Ilmicrofono Oggiono

image via Flickr, Ilmicrofono Oggiono

The educator’s role is similar to the role parents assume in treating ADD.

It begins by learning to understand and accept the problem, rather than making superficial judgments about the child such as “bad,” “lazy,” or “underachieving.”

A primary responsibility of school personnel and childcare workers is to function as team members in treating ADD. This involves setting appropriate expectations, clearly stating limits for behavior, giving feedback, providing effective consequences, reinforcing self-awareness and self-control, and communicating regularly with parents.

In addition, professionals in schools and childcare settings can help to develop and implement compensatory strategies and to identify and remediate associated learning problems.

As team members situated in the structured school environment, teachers and other educational personnel are in an ideal position to monitor the effectiveness of the other treatments (e.g., medical therapy, counseling, etc).

It is also possible for professionals in a childcare setting to provide help with the monitoring of various treatments.

While educators are essential team members, it is never appropriate for them to diagnose ADD or to recommend or modify medical therapies. These are medical decisions that must be made by an experienced physician in consultation with others.


Dr. Liden examines the vital roles parents and teachers play in his book, Accommodations for Success.  The 10-Step book gives parents power to create a highly personalized, effective IEP or 504 Plan.

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About cblmd

medical director of the being well center, ADHD expert, speaker, and author

One thought on “How a Teacher makes a difference with an ADD Student

  1. Pingback: ADD/ADHD Behavior Management Help for Parents and Teachers | The Being Well Center

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