30 days or 30 years? How Long People with ADD Should Take Medication

image via Flickr, Pink Sherbet Photography

image via Flickr, Pink Sherbet Photography

People with ADD show a great deal of variability in the length of time that they require medication as an aid to control weak attention. Because ADD is a biologically-based, constitutional problem that people do not out grow, some individuals require use of the medication for a lifetime.

Fifteen years ago, I more was more optimistic about helping individuals get to the place where they could be independent of the medication. With lots more experience, I now know that independence from medication is the exception rather than the rule.

Over the years, I have become particularly cautious about my patients’ being off medication when I know they will be behind the wheel of a car or in social situations where their decision-making has potentially serious ramifications.

When we look closely at all areas of life functioning, more than 75% of my patients continue to demonstrate a need for the aid of medication in adult life.

Pre-Requisites for Going Off ADD Medications

Some individuals do reach a point where they can “do it on their own” for varying periods of time. I have found that the key pre-requisites for a patient’s getting to this place include:

  • a firmly established balanced healthy daily routines
  • a keen awareness of what his problems are and how to control them, and
  • an ability to see at risk situations in advance and make the necessary adjustments.

My patients who are most likely to meet these pre-requisites generally have:

  • ADD that is moderate in its severity
  • a number of strengths that can be mobilized to compensate for attentional weaknesses, and
  • a history of close involvement with professionals

The Benefits of a Great Support Team

image via Flickr, Bruce McKay

image via Flickr, Bruce McKay

Additionally, my most successful patients who tackle ADD challenges without medication usually fully accept their differences, are highly motivated, and are surrounded by supportive family members, friends, teachers, and others.

The shortest period of time a person I have treated has needed the assistance of the medication has been three months. More commonly, individuals with ADD require medication for at least several years before they are able to function effectively without it at least for a brief period of time.

How We Transition Patients Off Medication

In my practice, when a patient appears to be ready for an extended trial off of medication based upon parent, spouse, teacher and other feedback, I have him stop medication for a couple of days and come into the office where we determine via testing and structured observation his readiness to discontinue the medication.

When everything suggests that he will be successful off medication, I have him remain off the medication for an additional 1-2 weeks. For the patient who is in school we notify teachers of the plan. I then have the patient come back to the office in two weeks to assess how he has performed day in and day out off of the medication. When he has done well, I see him monthly for six months, then quarterly.

Don’t Hesitate to Resume Medication When Needed!

Whenever I see signs of increased attentional problems that result in a significant life dysfunction, I resume the medication.  I’ve outlined my thoughts on a successful medication experience in 7 Keys to Successful (and Safe) Medication Treatment for ADD.


Dr. Liden’s clinic, The Being Well Center, offers free resources for people working through the challenges of living with ADD, both on medication and off.  Don’t miss the BWC resources page for free downloads and ideas that could help you or a friend today!

Advertisements

7 Keys to Successful (and Safe) Medication Treatment for ADD

image via Flickr, Purple Sherbet Photography

image via Flickr, Purple Sherbet Photography

Medication is often needed to help individuals optimally manage their ADD.

Without the aide of medication, it is almost impossible for most individuals with ADD to function to the best of their abilities and take advantage of other intervention strategies.

Yet, fear of medication, much of it unfounded, stands as a major barrier for many people to even take the step to get evaluated for ADD, let alone begin treatment for it.  Based upon more than 30 years of experience with over 10,000 patients with ADD, I’ve found there are seven keys to a successful and safe experience with medication.

  1. Find the right physician.

    Successful management of ADD requires that prescribing physicians have had specific ADD training and lots of experience working with ADD and the medications used to treat it.  They should have strong communication skills, the willingness to listen to your concerns and address them in a timely manner and a commitment to providing regular long-term follow-up. Critically evaluate your physician and his/her approach before you commit to medication treatment.

  1. Get an accurate diagnosis.

    Most knowledgeable physicians follow systematic procedures to arrive at an accurate diagnosis.  This may include the use of checklists, questionnaires, structured interviews, and ideally, some objective testing of attention abilities.  It’s one thing to hear about symptoms from a patient or significant other, but actually observing the individual’s attention during testing raises the reliability and validity of a physician’s ability to diagnose ADD to a whole different level.  Objective testing helps sort out individuals who don’t really have ADD and weed out those who might be drug seeking.  It also provides a baseline that can be used to accurately judge responsiveness to medication treatment. Response to a trial of medication should never be used as a diagnostic test!

  1. Make sure someone looks at the whole you.

    Each individual with ADD has their own unique profile…different temperaments, skills, abilities, health status, life experiences, attitudes, and beliefs.  Understanding these individual differences and their potential impact on medication treatment are critical for a successful experience.  Incorporating them into the process can help you and your physician interpret and manage apparent side effects and comply with the appropriate medication regimen.  More than 70% of individuals with ADD have co-existing mental health and/or chronic medical problems, sometimes as a consequence of untreated ADD.  If these go unrecognized or untreated, they can sabotage a successful experience with medication.

  1. Participate in objective medication trial tests.

    image via Flickr, Purple Sherbet Photography

    image via Flickr, Purple Sherbet Photography

    Judging the effectiveness of a given dosage or regimen of medication by relying on informal, unstructured observations or simple checklist/behavior ratings forms is fraught with difficulties.  Some observers don’t really understand what they should be looking for or have preconceived ideas about what should or shouldn’t happen, while others may have attitudes or beliefs about medication that color their observations.  The context of where people are making their observations can also result in great variability…monitoring effectiveness in a structured classroom is very different from watching a child play with peers in the backyard or sit in front of the TV or computer.  Asking an adult with ADD “How’s it going?” is like asking the blind to lead the blind…what it takes to make accurate self-observations is good attention and that’s the very thing they don’t have!  It is far better to find the right starting dose for a particular medication by participating in serial objective tests of attention on various doses of medication beginning with the lowest one that could make a difference and advancing as needed until an optimal dose is found.  This process helps ensure that the initial starting dose that you or your child starts taking in the real world is in the right ball park.  Then, fine tuning can be done based upon targeted observations in multiple life arenas.  The right medication, dosage, and daily regimen varies greatly from individual to individual based upon their unique attentional profile, degree of their problem, and the genetically-based way they metabolize various medications.  It is not uncommon for an optimal medication regimen to exceed the drug manufacturer’s marketing guidelines.

  1. Request a regimen that provides you all day coverage.

    ADD is a neurologically-based problem that is present 24 hours per day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.  It affects all aspects of life functioning.  As the day proceeds, the demands for efficient attention don’t decrease, they actually increase…it’s harder to pay attention during homework time, completing chores, maintaining healthy eating habits, driving a car, controlling emotional reactions, and communicating with others than it is to pay attention at school or work.  Therefore, individuals with ADD should have medication regimens that give them good attention from as close to the moment they wake up in the morning to the time they go to bed at night.  This might require using different combinations of medications: multiple doses of a short-acting medication, a long-acting combined with a short-acting, 2 doses of a long-acting or a stimulant in combination with a non-stimulant (e.g., Strattera).  It is safe to take multiple doses of these medications during the day because their effects are not additive.  More importantly, all day coverage helps reduce the serious risks that come with untreated ADD.  All day, all week coverage actually helps reduce the frequency of more common side effects such as appetite suppression and sleep disruption.

  1. Establish and maintain a Healthy Daily Routine (HDR).

    Having a balanced HDR is probably the most important thing you can do to have a positive experience with medication treatment for ADD.  Maintaining a predictable bedtime and wake time seven days a week, eating at least three meals a day, getting daily aerobic exercise, practicing some type of mind centering every day, and setting up a structure for staying on top of daily responsibilities provide an important foundation for success with medication.  Each of the elements of a balanced HDR in and of themselves helps improve aspects of your attention and your ability to regulate your behavior.  As a result, the medication doesn’t have to work so hard to get you to where you need to be, which could mean being able to use lower doses of the medications.  A balanced HDR will also help eliminate or reduce many of the more common side effects that occasionally occur with the medications used to treat ADD.  So, Get Balance!  It’s good for ADD, it minimizes side effects, makes the medication experience go more smoothly, and it’s the right thing to do for your overall health.

  1. Never use medication as the sole form of treatment.

    image via Flickr, Purple Sherbet Photography

    image via Flickr, Purple Sherbet Photography

    Relying on medication as the sole form of treatment is a setup for problems.  Dramatic things can happen when an individual with ADD starts using a proper medication regimen.  Many positive things will happen: you’ll be more alert during the day, less impulsive, less distractible, and better able to sustain your focus.  These changes may lead to increased performance at school and work, better follow through with responsibilities, greater behavior control and improved relationships with others.  However, the medication opens up a “new world”, not only the good but also a greater awareness of problem areas.  If you’re a sensitive, intense person, there may be more things to be sensitive and intense about, you may tune into areas where you have been dropping the ball, or behaviors that are problematic and irritating to others.  Therefore, having improved attention can be difficult, anxiety producing or even depressing.  Sometimes these consequences of improved self-awareness are misinterpreted as side effects of the medication.

Most individuals starting medication need support to understand and cope with this “new world” and develop new strategies to address problems with emotional regulation, independent functioning, and social/communication difficulties that they become more aware of.  Having an experienced counselor or coach to help lead you down a path to success is critical.  They can help you process your experiences, define the contributors to your problems, brainstorm new strategies to address problems, and support acceptance of who you really are.  In addition, they can help you establish and maintain the all important HDR.  Medication treatment for ADD goes much better when you walk down this new path with an experienced guide!


Dr. Craig B. Liden | The Being Well CenterCraig B. Liden, MD  is an internationally recognized expert in the diagnosis and treatment of ADD/ADHD.  Since the 1980’s, Dr. Liden has been in private practice evaluating and treating behavior and developmental issues across the life span.   He has treated more than 10,000 patients with ADD/ADHD and related co-morbidities.  Dr. Liden  has written and lectured extensively about ADD/ADHD, education, individual differences and a variety of health problems, most recently publishing Accommodations for Success: A Guide and Workbook for Creating 504 Agreements and IEP’s for Children with ADD/ADHD and ADD/ADHD Basics 101: How to Be A Good Consumer of Diagnostic and Treatment Services for ADD/ADHD.   Dr. Liden is the Founder and Medical Director of The Being Well Center located in Pittsburgh, PA.  He is available for speaking engagements, workshops, and interviews.

Behavior Change for the Adult with ADD

How does the adult with ADD work toward positive behavior change?

image via Flickr, Esther Gibbons

image via Flickr, Esther Gibbons

In my experience, the journey toward positive behavior change for the ADD adult begins with an experienced professional leading him through the same steps we encourage parents, teachers and childcare providers to use in managing behavior in children with ADD. That is, we help the adult with ADD to do the following:

  • Know who he is. It is important that he understand and accept his temperamental characteristics, his skills and abilities, his attentional abilities, his physical abilities, the stresses in his life, his attitudes and beliefs, and his self-esteem. He must understand which of these are changeable and which are not.
  • Set realistic expectations for himself. Based upon his understanding of his own unique profile of strengths and weaknesses, he defines behaviors are achievable for him.
  • Determine the factors contributing to an unproductive behavior and/or situation when it occurs.   In doing this, he asks himself the following questions:

◦ What is the expectation that is not being met?

◦ What are all the contributors to this failure?

◦ What role do I play in this?

◦ What role do factors outside of me play?

◦ What contributing factors are changeable and which are unchangeable or out of my control?

  • Develop a plan and put it into action. He refines the expectation as needed, and defines thoughts, actions, words and strategies that address all the factors that are under his control to maximize success at realizing the expectation, and tries it out in the real world.
  • Refine the plan when necessary. He reflects upon the success of the plan, and makes changes in the plan by modifying the expectation, the thoughts, words, action, and/or strategies.

In repeatedly guiding the adult with ADD through this sequence, the professional gives the adult progressively more responsibility. Ultimately, the adult becomes an independent problem-solver able to critically evaluate and modify his behavior in nearly any situation. In my experience, my adult patients who are open and committed to learning about themselves and how to effectively solve problems grow wise and become confident in their ability to deal with whatever is thrown their way.

How do limiting setting and use of consequences work with adults?

image via Flickr, Kaitlyn Rose

image via Flickr, Kaitlyn Rose

In adult life, limits and consequences are not generally defined in treatment or by supportive parents and teachers. Usually, it is our employer, our spouse, our friends, the police, the IRS, the bank, etc. who impose them.

Further, the limits are not always clearly defined and the consequences are often very serious. Treatment activities with the ADD adult involve clarifying the reality of the limits, defining strategies that promote success in meeting expectations, supporting and brainstorming plans when consequences do occur, and working with spouses, friends, and parents to help them allow the sometimes serious consequences to occur.


ADD/ADHD creates life challenges unique to each life stage.  Seek out care providers who have an appreciation for the challenges specific to adult expectations.  For help identifying a qualified care provider in your area, download Dr. Liden’s book, ADD/ADHD Basics 101.

Boost Creativity by Treating ADD

Are people with ADD more creative and does medication treatment interfere with creativity?

 

image via Flickr, telmo32

image via Flickr, telmo32

There is a fine line between creativity and impulsivity and distractibility.

When it comes to having new and unique ideas, there is something to say for the ADD population.

The rub, however, is that the impulsivity and distractibility that work together to promote the free flow of ideas usually combine with poor focus, inefficient monitoring, and short attention span to prevent even the best ideas from going anywhere.

In my experience, successful treatment allows the creative ADD mind to be focused, reflective, purposeful and planful enough so that the ideas it generates have a chance to become something in the real world.

To illustrate the difference successful treatment can make in the life of someone with ADD, let us introduce you to one of our patients, who we will call “Kory.”

Kory’s Story

medication add diagnosisWe first met Kory when he was 8 years old and in the second grade. At that time, he was making life miserable for his family, his teacher, and his peers. His parents described life with him as “bedlam.” Chaos and disruption seemed to happen whenever he was around. The same scenario seemed to play itself out at each and every social event Kory and his family attended. Without apparent reason, Kory started to “act-up.” His parents quietly scolded him. As Kory continued, his parents repeated their reprimand with hushed intensity. Kory explosively retaliated, physically and verbally. Startled, others stared in their direction. Angry and embarrassed, the family prematurely called it an evening. In response to this recurring scenario, family members began to walk on eggshells, hoping to avoid setting off Kory’s violent reactions.

Kory’s parents complained that getting him to assume any responsibility was nearly impossible. He required constant nagging to get anything done whether that was bringing his homework home, practicing his piano, or getting up in the morning. His parents resented Kory tremendously for the black cloud that seemed to be hanging over the family.

Kory’s teacher reported that he was not working to his potential. He was not following classroom rules, not listening to directions, and not being courteous to anyone. Reportedly, Kory attempted to take over all interactions with his peers. He was always punching, pinching, pushing, or tripping someone. Needless to say, Kory had no friends. His parents were worried about Kory’s future–they actually feared that he might end up in prison.

Kory is now in the sixth grade. For four years, Kory, his family, and his teachers have been involved in a comprehensive treatment program that we developed after a thorough evaluation. Life with Kory is no longer chaotic. His parents feel comfortable taking him nearly anywhere. Moreover, they are beginning to actually appreciate what Kory brings to the family. Generally, Kory is able to express his feelings appropriately now and is genuinely open to feedback concerning his behavior.

Kory, independently completes his homework and studies for upcoming tests on a daily basis. He is earning A’s and B’s in school. He has excelled in music and practices his piano and trumpet every morning without a hassle.

Kory is working hard to dispel his bad reputation with his peers. In fact, he has succeeded in establishing a few very nice friendships.

Kory continues to have his rough edges. However, for a 12 year old, he has a wisdom about him. He knows his strengths and weaknesses. He knows himself better than most of us do and because of this, when life’s challenges come his way, he will be able to creatively, responsibly, and wisely tackle them.


The Being Well Center treats individuals with ADD/ADHD from ages 3 to 93.  For more guidance on how to find successful treatment for ADD/ADHD, download Dr. Liden‘s guide ADD Basics 1o1.

Living on the ADD Edge

Why do so many people with ADD live life on the edge?

image via Flickr, Riccardo Palazzani

image via Flickr, Riccardo Palazzani

Living life on the edge: procrastinating and procrastinating only to complete the task, once again, at the eleventh hour, pushing the limits of the car’s maneuverability at 75 miles per hour, scheduling ten meetings in a five-meeting block of time, attacking the black diamond slope with beginner’s skills.

Each of these events provides the ADD individual with a “rush”—an adrenalin rush that is a consequence of the stress response. For all of us, the perception of danger sets off this response resulting in increased arousal; this allows us to hyperfocus.

By hyperfocusing in times of danger, we are more likely to save ourselves.

This series of events is clearly helpful for the ADD individual who struggles with focus otherwise.   By using the stress response, the competent individual with ADD is able to pull it all off again and again, making procrastination an art form.

The rush allows him to experience intense focus and, in this way, pull it off at 2:00 AM the morning it’s due, behind the wheel of the car, during meeting number four, and on the ski slope.

There is a rub to all this however; the stress response also results in elevated heart rate, increased blood pressure, and chronic anxiety.

The ADD individual living life on the edge thinking he has, time and time again, successfully avoided disaster in his life is actually a time bomb waiting to detonate.


What helps you hyperfocus?  Is it living “on the edge,” or have other strategies worked for you?  Dr. Liden discusses other ways to avoid the “ticking time bomb” approach in his best-selling book, Pay Attention! Answers to common questions about the diagnosis and treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder.

ADD and Temperament Extremes

Temperament Extremes | The Being Well Center

image via Flickr, Austin Kirk

Individuals with ADD seem to have a greater frequency of extreme temperamental characteristics, those inborn behavioral response patterns that shape how an individual approaches and responds to life’s events and circumstances.

The most common temperamental extremes identified in individuals with ADD appear to be high activity level, low threshold of response, high intensity of reaction, negative mood, slow adaptability, short persistence, and unpredictability of basic bodily functions such as eating, sleeping, and bowel habits.

This means that people with ADD tend demonstrate a short fuse, a low frustration tolerance, a tendency to demonstrate temper outbursts, and difficulty adjusting to change. In addition, they often seem more excitable, sensitive, cranky, and unpredictable.

Why is it that so many individuals with ADD seem to have extreme temperaments?

It may be that individuals with ADD come into the world with a greater number of these temperamental extremes. However, it is also possible that these behaviors seem to be more common in individuals with ADD because their attentional differences interfere with their awareness of and ability to control these built-in personality characteristics.

That is, it may be that extremes in temperament such as high activity level, high intensity, low threshold, negative mood, slow adaptability, and short persistence occur just as frequently in the non-ADD populations as in the ADD population.

In order to exert control over these temperamental characteristics, an individual must be aware of his extremes, monitor his behavior, and develop effective ways to keep his extremes in check. As this requires efficient monitoring, problem-solving, vigilance, and impulse control, it is likely that individuals with ADD will struggle with their temperament more frequently and as a consequence, demonstrate these characteristics more often.

What’s your experience with ADD and Extreme Temperaments?  Do you or a loved one fall strongly on one end or another of the temperament spectrum?  The Being Well Center follows The Being Well System, which looks beyond the symptoms of ADD/ADHD to take into account a person’s in-born temperament traits.  Treating the whole person is crucial to a successful ADD/ADHD treatment.  Talk to your doctor or care provider about your temperament traits.

5 Reasons We Know ADD is Real

I’ve heard some professionals say, “ADD is just a cover-up label for suburban parents who cannot deal with their emotionally-disturbed kids.” Some write it off as “being in vogue–the problem for this decade.” Others wonder, “If ADD is a result of an inborn physical difference, then why wasn’t it around when we were kids?

I respond strongly to this skepticism. ADD is a very real problem!

Because we are more knowledgeable, we are able to identify ADD more frequently and, thereby, it appears to be in vogue. But ADD was around when we were kids. We just weren’t aware of it.

Biologically-based attention differences are probably no more common in 2014 than they were in 1950. However, dysfunction resulting from these differences is more common because societal expectations have significantly changed over the past several decades. Many of these new demands put a high premium on the individual having efficient attentional skills in a way that was never demanded before. As a result, just as with ADD in an individual, these new societal expectations have uncovered an underlying societal problem that has probably always been there.

1.  New opportunities for our children highlight the existence of ADD

In the ‘40’s and ‘50’s, most parents worried about the basics. Nutritious food on the table and a roof overhead. Reading, writing and arithmetic. Basic health. In fact, my parents worried about whether I would survive polio or die like several of my best playmates. Thanks to amazing technological advances, today we, as parents, take these basics for granted and want much more for our children. We want our children to achieve at school, to go to college, and to get a job that is better than the one we have.

I am constantly impressed how far we will go to provide enriching opportunities and to push our children in the name of wanting them to have the chances we did not have. Often, these “chances” backfire because they require proficiency in areas, like paying attention, that some children just don’t have.

image via Flickr, woodleywonderworks

image via Flickr, woodleywonderworks

In our schools, the demand for high achievement and independent learning has filtered down to earlier and earlier grades. Curriculum content has expanded so that many teachers are overwhelmed and unprepared to introduce a wealth of new material, let alone to teach the basics to children who require some extra help.  Support services in most school districts are shrinking rather than expanding. Access to extra help is often contingent upon student failure rather than being viewed as a preventative response to minor difficulties.

It is easy to see why regular classroom teachers get frustrated when they are placed in the bind of producing high group achievement test scores to please the school board while watching 20% of their class struggle to just get by.  Without support to address these children’s needs, most teachers either become guilty or get burned-out, both of which reduce their effectiveness further.

 2.  Modern parenting styles highlight the existence of ADD

Societal attitudes about discipline and behavior management have changed radically as well. These changes have also contributed to our increased awareness of ADD–the problem that has always been there. The pendulum has swung from the rigid, authoritarian, and, frequently, punitive approach of the ’50’s to a more permissive and democratic approach in the ’70’s and ’80’s.

Today’s parents are more likely to provide a detailed answer to the child’s proverbial question “Why?” than to end the discussion with “Because I said so!” In an attempt to promote self-esteem and foster creativity, many parents hesitate to set firm limits on children’s behavior or to structure their lives. Many parents are afraid to say “No.” They walk on eggshells instead. They try to control their child’s behavior with rewards rather than meaningful consequences. Many children can go with the flow and adapt to whatever management style is used.

However, the more democratic, laid-back approach places demands for self-awareness and self-control on ADD children that they are rarely equipped to meet. The resulting behavior problems in the home or school bring the ADD children into the spotlight and allow us to identify them.

 3.  Modern family units highlight the existence of ADD

image via Flickr, Marco Antonio Torres

image via Flickr, Marco Antonio Torres

The nature of the family unit has significantly changed in the past 50 years. Again, this change has forced us to become aware of the ADD population. More children are being raised in single parent homes. More and more, both parents need to hold full-time jobs outside the home. In our mobile society, Grandma no longer lives two houses away but more commonly, two hundred miles away.

All this means that the support system that previously was there to structure and bail out the child with ADD is no longer present.

Moreover, this prop has been pulled out at a time when society has placed increasing demands on children without creating increasing levels of support.

There is, for example, a shocking lack of affordable, quality childcare services across the country. As a result, many children spend countless hours alone or in the care of people who have not received basic training in child development, let alone training in working with difficult children.

In a permissive society, without supportive props, the ADD child is a set-up to misuse the increased amount of unstructured time available to him. Truancy, vandalism, and delinquency are often the outcome. And each time an individual commits such a “crime,” we have another opportunity to identify ADD.

The pace of growing up has quickened and, as a result, children are faced with increasing expectations to exercise mature social judgment. Adolescent children are placed in the position of having to make independent, adult decisions about sex, drinking, and drugs. These demands put the impulsive ADD child with poor problem-solving skills at an even greater risk for alcoholism, drug addiction, and teenage pregnancy and provide him with another chance to be in the spotlight.

4.  Our technological society highlights the existence of ADD

image via Flickr, Mervi Eskelinen

image via Flickr, Mervi Eskelinen

As our society has moved from an industrially-based to a technologically-based economy, a new set of skills and abilities are now required to make it on the job.

The highly structured, physically demanding, manual labor jobs have been replaced by white-collar positions demanding good organizational skills, effective problem-solving abilities, and independent self-monitoring.

Once again, the individual with ADD is at a disadvantage and at risk for being identified. It would not be surprising to find that individuals with ADD have a disproportionately high representation in the ranks of the unemployed.

5.  Increased stress levels highlight the existence of ADD

Finally, because of these and numerous other reasons, life’s stresses appear to be more complex and challenging than they have ever been. And if there is anything that requires us to be reflective, focused, vigilant monitors, and efficient problem-solvers, it is stress management. Without the prerequisites to meet the challenge, the individual with ADD enters into a devastating downward spiral. Marital difficulties. Money problems. Mounting anxiety and depression. Tranquilizers. Just getting by. Social isolation. Back pain. Sick days. Weight gain. Hypertension. Constant fear. Alcohol abuse. Traffic accidents. Hospitalization. Bankruptcy. Immobilization. Giving up.

ADD is Real, and We Know It.

For all these reasons and probably many more, ADD now plays a more significant and very real role in people’s lives. And, as a result, we all have the opportunity to see its impact.  When people are skeptical about the significance or even the existence of ADD, they create a barrier to overcoming a very serious, but very addressable, health disorder.  Don’t let skepticism rob you of progress toward a better, and easier, life.  ADD is a very real problem.  But it’s a problem with very real solutions.


More answers and information about ADD/ADHD can be found in Dr. Liden’s book, Pay Attention!: Answers to Common Questions About the Diagnosis and Treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder.


10,000 people living with ADD have found hope and help navigating the challenges of ADD at The Being Well Center.  No matter where you are in life, we can help, starting today.