The Most Important Thing You Can Do This Summer: Read 10+5+5

Best Tip for Summer Reading | The Being Well Center

By mid-July, it happens. Soccer camp, popsicles by the pool, and road trips have ruled the days. But now, that first nagging thought blossoms: “Back to School is coming.” And with that comes fear of the Summer Slide.

Summer Slide happens as kids take a three-month break from reading, writing, and arithmetic. The school skills pursued so diligently over the year backslide from lack of use. All of us (kids, moms, dads, and even family pets) need a breather from the familiar tears-over-homework-at-the-kitchen-table scene, and summer can be that rejuvenating break for everyone. But is there a way to enjoy summer, avoid the dreaded Summer Slide, and head toward school success instead of catch-up?

Over our years of counseling kids and families through the Summer Slide to a successful transition into school, we’ve found one simple tip makes a huge difference: The Read 10+5+5 Summer Strategy.

Best Tip for Summer Reading | The Being Well Center

The Read 10+5+5 Summer Strategy

Reading skills need relatively little maintenance to stay fresh over summer, but neglecting the reading could have noticeable consequences at the start of the school year.

You’ll be amazed at how investing just 20 minutes a day, 3-5 times a week, in enjoying and discussing reading will have your child ready to jump right back into school.

The 10+5+5 formula is simple: 10 minutes of independent reading (or reading to younger, emerging readers), plus 5 minutes of writing about what’s been read, plus 5 minutes of discussing the reading with a grown-up.

10 Minutes Reading

Best Tip for Summer Reading | The Being Well Center

image via Flickr by EvelynGiggles

Require your children to read 10 minutes a day, 3-5 days a week or more. Make it a fun, relaxed time—pick cozy reading spots indoors or out, take a reading “field trip” to a coffee shop, or rearrange the bedroom to include a special reading chair or bean bag. Maybe your child has to finish his 10 minutes reading before video games. Maybe she can settle in to read while dinner’s being prepped. The time of day doesn’t matter, just the habit.

How to Find Books that Hold Interest

Especially for struggling readers, even 10 minutes of reading time can seem like an eternity and lead to power struggles. Fresh, interesting reading material can make all the difference. For ideas on great books specific to your child’s interests, age, and reading level, consult the expertise of your local librarian or peruse these expert guides:

What to Read When by Pam Allyn

The Read Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease

Guys Read: Funny Business by Jon Scieszka

121 Books: A Very Subjective Guide to the Best Kid Books of All Time by Andy Ward

Summer Reading for 7-9 year olds by Tsh Oxenreider

Summer Reading for 10-12 year olds by Tsh Oxenreider

Relax it for summer: It’s summer, not school, so shoot for fun, interactive reading materials. Expand your definition of “books” to include things like magazines, graphic novels, comics, picture books, and newspapers. If it’s interesting to your child and can qualify as written material, let them explore it. The only rule here is that they have to spend 10 dedicated minutes reading.

5 Minutes Writing

 Once your child has finished 10 minutes reading, they should immediately turn to writing for 5 minutes about what they’ve read. The goal in this step is to encourage reading comprehension and enhance understanding.

If your child eagerly dives into writing about what he’s read, let him run with it.

If your child isn’t sure where to begin, you might write a question at the top of her reader’s journal page to prompt her thinking. Here are some strategy questions that stimulate responses to reading:

  • Summarizing: Leave the top of the page blank for an illustration of what has been read and the bottom half lined for a short written summary of what happened in the story.
  • Connecting: “This reminds me of…”
  • Questioning: Write down a quote from what you read and answer, “This makes me wonder/question…” or “I’m confused…”
  • Visualizing: Write down a quote from what you read and answer (or illustrate), “I get a picture in my head…”
  • Determining Importance: “This is really important…”
  • Synthesizing: “I get it! This reading makes me think about…”

Younger readers can participate in 5 Minutes Writing too—illustrating a scene from the story is as valid a response as writing words about it. They’re still thinking, summarizing, and expressing what they’ve understood. Goal accomplished!

Relax it for summer: Don’t worry about grammar, spelling, or editing in this writing step. Make the process fun by purchasing a new notebook for a Reader’s Journal. Buy a new pen or pencil. Find a dedicated spot in your house to keep the reading materials so they’re easy to locate when reading time rolls around.

5 Minutes Discussing

image via Flickr by Paul Hamilton

image via Flickr by Paul Hamilton

You may be the most critical part of your child’s summer reading experience. At some point after your children have finished their 10 Minutes Reading and 5 Minute Writing, take 5 minutes to discuss with them what they’ve read and thought about.

Your questions can be open ended or scripted. What matters is that your interest in your child, her activity, and her thoughts is sincere.   You may wait until bedtime when the house is quiet to discuss. You may bring it up while lounging at the pool. You may make a ritual of sitting with a glass of lemonade for 5 minutes of undivided attention when you get home from work. Or, you may outsource and call the grandparents for a telephone book report!

Relax it for summer: Be a listener, not a teacher. You are under no pressure to teach, guide, instruct, or assess. This is summer, the days are long and lazy, and you’re simply providing an interested, open audience to listen to your child’s thoughts. Some questions you might use to prompt the discussion:

  • What was most interesting?
  • What did it remind you of?
  • What did you wonder about as you were reading?
  • What part do you think I would enjoy reading?

Parents Can Read 10+5+5 too!

The most powerful move you can make to prevent summer slide is to model Read 10+5+5 for your kids. Why should kids have all the reading fun? Read 10+5+5 could be a great initiative to kickstart your summer reading list! Read 10+5+5 is an amazingly powerful way to connect with your kids and give yourself some well-deserved relaxation and meditation time in the process. Pick up a book and read alongside them! Pick up a pen and journal with them! Take 5 minutes to tell them what you’ve been reading and thinking.

 

Advertisements

Understanding Temperament: Adaptability

image via Flickr by David D

image via Flickr by David D

A key goal in effective treatment for Attention Deficit Disorder should be to understand our temperament and the temperament of the children we live and work with. 

Understanding the concept of temperament and applying that knowledge to ourselves as parents and teachers and to those around us helps us to better understand behavior…struggles, failures, and successes.

Understanding ADAPTABILITY

Adaptability refers to the amount of time and effort it takes to adapt or accommodate to a new person, situation, or concept after our initial approach or withdrawal response.

This can range from easy (highly adaptable) to very slow (non-adaptable). Those of us who are highly adaptable easily integrate new routines, expectations, and concepts into our life.

Those of us who are slow to adapt struggle tremendously with these same changes. In the classroom, the child who is highly adaptable readily goes with the flow regardless of the changes in his day, such as routines, class structures, and rules.

The child who is slow to adapt may require an extended time to get into the flow at the beginning of each school year, struggle with changing expectations, buck new rules, and resist changes in routines. This same child may seem slow to understand and integrate new concepts that are presented even when they are in sync with his ability level.


Temperament Traits and ADHD | The Being Well Center | Free PrintableUpcoming blog posts will discuss the other 9 Temperamental Traits that make you and your child unique.  Follow along with this Being Well Center | Temperament Worksheet designed to help you pinpoint where your or your child’s temperament trait falls on the continuum. Catch up on previous posts about Activity LevelRhythmicityToleranceIntensity, and Mood.


Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and join a community of people interested in getting the facts straight with compassionate support for ADD/ADHD!

Rule for Effective ADHD Treatment: Know Thy Temperament

Know Temperament for ADHD Treatment | The Being Well CenterTemperament refers to our in-born (not learned) behavioral style. We all come into the world with a unique set of temperamental characteristics that remain stable throughout our lifetime. These characteristics modulate how we respond to every situation in our lives.

Understanding our own temperament as parents and teachers and the temperament of our children is incredibly helpful in being the best we can be and in bringing out the best in our children.

In our experience, understanding the concept of temperament and applying that knowledge to ourselves as parents and teachers and to those around us helps us to better understand behavior…struggles, failures, and successes.

In fact, failure to understand a child’s temperament and the role it plays in his behavior and performance can be a major source of frustration for parents and teachers.  In our model, there are nine dimensions of temperament and we all fall somewhere along a continuum for each one. The ranges for these continuums are presented in upcoming blog posts for each temperamental trait. It is important to know that where an individual falls along this continuum for any given temperamental trait is neither good nor bad…it just is!

In fact, the same temperamental trait (e.g., being very intense) that is helpful to us in one situation may interfere with our behavior or performance in another.

A key goal should be to understand our temperament and the temperament of the children we live and work with. We need to critically consider how any extreme temperamental traits might be contributing to problems in performance, behavior, or social interaction. When temperamental extremes do interfere with performance, behavior or social interaction, we need to learn how best to work around or control these extremes.

Therefore, when we suspect that an ADD/ADHD child’s temperamental characteristics play a role in his failure to meet an expectation at school, we know we must develop some type of accommodation to address this contribution.


Keep following along this week as we delve in deeper detail into the 9 Temperament Traits recognized at The Being Well Center.

For greater detail and worksheets to guide you in discovering your child’s (and your own!) temperament and how to make those traits work positively for you, purchase Dr. Liden’s book, Accommodations for Success.

Do We Need Special Classes for Kids with ADD?

image via Flickr, Jirka Matousek

image via Flickr, Jirka Matousek

The benefits of special classes or tutoring for kids with ADD…

All children, particularly those who are distractible, can benefit from the low teacher to student ratios that are characteristic of special classes and tutoring services.

Furthermore, some children with ADD require tutoring or special education services when their skill deficiencies in reading, spelling, writing, or math interfere with satisfactory academic progress.

…On the flip side, how special services can harm rather than help…

However, associated learning problems seen in children with ADD are often the result of inattention rather than basic skill deficits. When this is the case, academic performance improves as attentional weaknesses are appropriately treated.

Therefore, quickly jumping to tutoring or special education services when academic problems arise can temporarily cover-up the underlying attention problem.

When this band-aid approach is used, the problem inevitably resurfaces in a magnified form later.


Have you found special classes or tutoring have helped or hindered your child?

Looking for a comprehensive, action-oriented guide to navigating the confusing and often frustrating IEP or 504 Agreement process?  Dr. Liden’s Accommodation for Success is the answer you’ve been hoping to find!  Get a copy for yourself or a friend.  No better gift you can give than a guide to school success!

How a Teacher makes a difference with an ADD Student

image via Flickr, Ilmicrofono Oggiono

image via Flickr, Ilmicrofono Oggiono

The educator’s role is similar to the role parents assume in treating ADD.

It begins by learning to understand and accept the problem, rather than making superficial judgments about the child such as “bad,” “lazy,” or “underachieving.”

A primary responsibility of school personnel and childcare workers is to function as team members in treating ADD. This involves setting appropriate expectations, clearly stating limits for behavior, giving feedback, providing effective consequences, reinforcing self-awareness and self-control, and communicating regularly with parents.

In addition, professionals in schools and childcare settings can help to develop and implement compensatory strategies and to identify and remediate associated learning problems.

As team members situated in the structured school environment, teachers and other educational personnel are in an ideal position to monitor the effectiveness of the other treatments (e.g., medical therapy, counseling, etc).

It is also possible for professionals in a childcare setting to provide help with the monitoring of various treatments.

While educators are essential team members, it is never appropriate for them to diagnose ADD or to recommend or modify medical therapies. These are medical decisions that must be made by an experienced physician in consultation with others.


Dr. Liden examines the vital roles parents and teachers play in his book, Accommodations for Success.  The 10-Step book gives parents power to create a highly personalized, effective IEP or 504 Plan.

Get Help for ADD in School

School Success for ADD | The Being Well Center

image via Flickr, Jekino Educatie

There are two ways that students with ADD may receive support and accommodations in school. When ADD severely impacts upon learning and academic performance, the child may be eligible for Special Educational services through IEP law.

When a parent believes a child is struggling academically, the first step is to express his concerns to the building principal or guidance counselor. I always recommend that the parent put his concerns and a formal request for a thorough evaluation in writing addressed to the principal. In my experience, it is important that the parent keep a copy of all written documents for himself; creating a paper trail may be critical in insuring future educational accommodations for the child.

After a formal evaluation by qualified school personnel, the child with ADD may meet the criteria for being identified as learning disabled, emotionally disturbed or “other health impaired” and therefore qualify for special education services. At that point, parents and school personnel work together to define in writing an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) to meet the unique educational needs of the child.

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 states that any institution receiving federal fund must make accommodations for people with recognized disabilities. Because ADD is such a recognized disability, children with ADD are eligible for accommodations in any federally funded school.

Accommodations in school include allotment of extra time to complete tasks and tests, use of teacher signed assignment book, preferential seating and increased frequency of feedback to parents.

The first step in pursuing accommodations under Section 504 is for the parent to express his concerns and accommodations request verbally and in writing to the principal, guidance counselor, or, in college, the disabilities services office. As the appropriate accommodations are defined, it is important that they be formalized in writing; this ensures compliance, accountability, and future accommodations.

Are there other services available for the ADD child who experiences difficulties despite the usual interventions?

image via Flickr, Bart Everson

image via Flickr, Bart Everson

When ADD severely compromises the child’s functioning at home and school despite intervention, he may be eligible for Wrap-Around or Therapeutic Staff Support (TSS) services through the county or state mental health department.

These services assume different names and forms across the country and are dependent upon the unique needs of the child. For some children, the service involves access to a trained support person in the home to help with behavior management and independent functioning. For others, it involves having a support person accompany the child to each of his classes to facilitate his meeting school expectations.

While it varies from state to state, access to these kinds of services generally require the child be assigned a mental health or medical assistance case manager and to participate in additional comprehensive testing. I recommend to parents whose child can benefit from these services to begin the process by contacting the county or state mental health office.


Accommodations for Success | Dr. LidenIf you’re ready to secure educational support for your child, you will find Dr. Liden’s book, Accommodations for Success, invaluable.  Dr. Liden walks you through every step necessary to get the customized support you need for your child to achieve and succeed.

9 Traits You Should Know About Your Temperament

Temperament refers to our in-born (not learned) behavioral style. We all come into the world with a unique set of temperamental characteristics that remain stable throughout our lifetime. These characteristics modulate how we respond to every situation in our lives. Understanding our own temperament as individuals and the temperament of our children is incredibly helpful in being the best we can be and in bringing out the best in our children.

In our experience, understanding the concept of temperament and applying that knowledge to ourselves as parents and spouses and to those around us helps us to better understand behavior…struggles, failures, and successes. In fact, failure to understand a child’s temperament and the role it plays in his behavior and performance can be a major source of frustration for parents.

add treatment, family, the being well centerIn our model, there are nine dimensions of temperament and we all fall somewhere along a continuum for each one. The ranges for these continuums are presented in the next section for each temperamental trait. It is important to know that where an individual falls along this continuum for any given temperamental trait is neither good nor bad…it just is! In fact, the same temperamental trait (e.g., being very intense) that is helpful to us in one situation may interfere with our behavior or performance in another.

A key goal should be to understand our temperament and the temperament of the children we live and work with. We need to critically consider how any extreme temperamental traits might be contributing to problems in performance, behavior, or social interaction. When temperamental extremes do interfere with performance, behavior or social interaction, we need to learn how best to work around or control these extremes.

Therefore, when we suspect that an ADD/ADHD child’s or adult’s temperamental characteristics play a role in his failure to meet an expectation at school or work, we know we must develop some type of accommodation to address this contribution.

1. Activity Level refers to the amount of activity from high to low that we engage in throughout our day. Some of us are always moving and physically active; others of us are more sedentary and spend most of our time engaged in quiet activities. The child with a high activity level is likely to be in his element in gym class and playing tag during recess and to have more difficulty staying settled during quiet seated activities; on the other hand, the child with a low activity level might prefer sitting and drawing or reading during free time rather than going outside to play an active game.

2. Rhythmicity refers to the predictability of our daily bodily routines for sleeping, eating and going to the bathroom. It ranges from highly regular to highly irregular. Those of us who are highly rhythmic are hungry, have a bowel movement, and feel sleepy at about the same times every day. Others of us, who are highly irregular do not have a schedule or rhythm at all…our wake-up time varies from day to day; we feel ready for bed at different times and need to go to the bathroom at various, unpredictable times throughout our day. This unpredictability can present a challenge for the child who is asked to adhere to a rigid school schedule where everyone eats and takes bathroom breaks at the same time every day.

3. Threshold of Response refers to the amount of stimulation, ranging from high to low, we require before responding. Those of us with a low threshold require very little to make us happy, sad, angry, etc. Others of us with a high threshold require a lot before we react. The child with a very high threshold may be injured and not seem to notice his pain. At the other extreme, the child with a very low threshold may be bothered by the slightest noise, the frown from the teacher, the tags in clothing, the buzz of the fluorescent lights, the seams in socks, and the taste, texture or smell of food.

4. Frustration Tolerance refers to the level of difficulty we are able to experience before we become frustrated. Frustration tolerance ranges from high to low. Those of us who have a high frustration tolerance are able experience an awful lot of difficulty before we feel frustration. Others of us who have a low frustration tolerance become frustrated very easily. The child with a high frustration tolerance may be able to deal with repeated struggles and failures in the classroom without experiencing significant frustration. The child with a very low frustration tolerance, however, can be quick to experience frustration when asked to perform tasks of only moderate difficulty. This, in turn, sets him up for repeated struggles and can turn into negativity towards school and other learning situations.

5. Intensity of Response refers to the strength of our responses ranging from high tolow. These responses can be demonstrated outwardly or experienced inwardly. So it is not always easy to judge someone’s intensity of response by what we see. Our intensity is independent of the quality (negative or positive) of our response and the immediacy of our response (threshold).

add in school children | the being well centerThose of us with a high intensity of response experience or show strong responses. When we are happy we are very, very happy; when we are sad, we are very, very sad; when we are angry, we are very, very angry. Others of us who have a low intensity of response barely show a blip on the screen when our emotions are set off. A child with high intensity may become overly silly at birthday celebrations, rageful during a conflict on the playground, and immobilized with nervousness on math time-tests. On the other hand, the child with low intensity of response may not seem to react at all; she does not experience extreme excitement over a special event or intense disappointment over a failure. In fact, we may find it difficult to read the reactions of a child with low intensity, often misjudging low intensity for not caring.

It is important to remember that when observing for intensity of response, we can’t always judge the book by looking at the cover; some very intense people experience all their intensity internally; nail-biting, skin-picking, complaints of a tightness in one’s chest, stomachaches, jaw aches, or headaches, etc., may be our only clues to what is going on inside.

High intensity of response (externally or internally) is a very powerful temperamental trait. When present, it can rule over everything: good thinking, paying attention, proper self-control, and appropriate social skills to name a few. Failure to identify a high intensity response pattern and appropriately accommodate for it can, inadvertently, set a child up for turning to a variety of other dysfunctional behaviors in an attempt to cope with her strong reactions including such things as over-eating, drug use, and developing an “I don’t care” attitude.

6. Mood refers to the overall quality of emotion throughout the day ranging from very positive to very negative. Those of us with positive mood spend the greater portion of our day in a pleasant mood; we are likely to put a positive spin on everything; problems are challenges. Others of us with a negative mood may seem more critical throughout our day; we are likely to see the glass as half empty. A child with positive mood is generally pleasant in the classroom and may even struggle to recognize when difficulties are present or percolating. The child with negative mood is likely to respond with frown, a headshake, or critical comment to most anyone or anything.

7. Approach-Withdrawal refers to our initial response to new persons, places, events, and ideas ranging from highly approach to highly withdrawal. Those of us who are highly approach readily jump into attempting new tasks, meeting new people, and trying new foods. Others of us who are highly withdrawal resist trying a new activity, avoid attending a party with strangers, and step back from a different kind of food. The child who is highly approach will not hesitate to start a conversation with a new student or teacher, jump into new activities and embrace new concepts and academic challenges. The child who is highly withdrawal may struggle with new students, avoid new playground activities, and step back from an unfamiliar concept in the classroom.

8. Adaptability refers to the amount of time and effort it takes to adapt or accommodate to a new person, situation, or concept after our initial approach or withdrawal response. This can range from easy (highly adaptable) to very slow (non-adaptable). Those of us who are highly adaptable easily integrate new routines, expectations, and concepts into our life. Those of us who are slow to adapt struggle tremendously with these same changes. In the classroom, the child who is highly adaptable readily goes with the flow regardless of the changes in his day, such as routines, class structures, and rules. The child who is slow to adapt may require an extended time to get into the flow at the beginning of each school year, struggle with changing expectations, buck new rules, and resist changes in routines. This same child may seem slow to understand and integrate new concepts that are presented even when they are in sync with his ability level.

9. Persistence refers to how long we stick with tasks regardless of their difficulty ranging from very long to very short. Some of us are highly persistent even in the face of tremendous difficulty; we keep going and going and going. Others of us spend only a short time on a challenging task before giving up and moving on to something else. The child with long persistence resists giving up and will practice a task repeatedly until he has mastered it. This same child may struggle to stop an activity when it is time to move on if he has not yet mastered or completed it. The child with short persistence may stop practice before mastery, struggle to stick with longer, more complex tasks, and be ready to put down a challenging book long before the last page.

A Final Word about Temperament

9 Temperament Traits | The Being Well CenterEach of our temperamental traits is important and plays a significant role in shaping who we are, how we behave, and how we experience and respond to the world around us. While we have defined and discussed these traits individually, it is important to remember that in the real world these traits do not exist in isolation; they interact with each other to influence our behavior in a complex way. Subtle differences in temperamental profiles can result in dramatic differences in how they present themselves in our homes and classrooms.

For example, a child with a negative mood, long persistence, slow adaptability, low frustration tolerance, and high intensity of reaction may be very difficult to work with when this set of characteristics interact with each other to result in frequent, very big negative reactions that last a long time in response to the inevitable changes and challenges that occur every day in the classroom.

On the other hand, a different child with a very similar profile including a negative mood, long persistence, slow adaptability, low frustration tolerance, but a low intensity of reaction may be much less difficult to work with. This is because his low intensity of reaction means his frequent, negative reactions to the changes and challenges in the classroom will be milder and, even if they do persist, their small magnitude may not register on anyone’s radar.

Therefore, as we examine a child’s temperamental profile, it is important to look closely at each trait separately and then consider how each of these individual traits may interact with the others to shape the behavior and personality we are observing.

We’d like to share a quick worksheet to help you apply the 9 Temperament Traits to yourself or a loved one.  Download: 9 TEMPERAMENT TRAITS WORKSHEET.  Where do you fall on the spectrum?  Your spouse?  Your children?